Chief Wolf Robe
NativeAmerican

by

I.M. Spadecaller

Chief Wolf Robe
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Chief Wolf Robe
In 1864, U.S. Military forces at Sand Creek, Colorado, massacred a peaceful group of Cheyenne Indians. In 1876 at the Battle of Little Bighorn, the Cheyenne joined the Sioux and defeated Col. George Custer. In 1877, Chief Wolf Robe was forced to leave the open plains and to relocate his tribe on to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian Reservation in “Indian Territory,” which is part of present day Oklahoma. In 1990, the remaining number of Cheyenne descendants was about 11,000 - many of whom still live on reservations in southwestern Oklahoma and southeastern Montana. Throughout the last century, the iconic portrait photographs of Wolf Robe have been very popular. Wolf Robe was awarded the Benjamin Harrison Peace Medal in 1890 for his assistance in the Cherokee Commission, which moved his tribe to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian Reservation. Many painters and sculptors have created artworks based upon the photographs of F.A. Rinehart, who first photographed Wolf Robe in 1898. This is Spadecaller's version. This is a digital composite / painting copyrighted by Matthew Schwartz on 7. 5. 2016. All Spadecaller artwork by Matthew Schwartz posted on Imagekind, Facebook, and elsewhere is copyright protected. Permission to copy, appropriate, reclaim, alter, or otherwise distribute, display, or sell is prohibited.
As Shown: $17.65
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Paper: Enhanced Matte
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Frame: Wide Square Black
Size: 17.5" x 15.0"
Paper: Enhanced Matte
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PaulCoco
PaulCoco ::
July 06, 2016
Magnificent in every aspect. Bravo!

spadecaller
spadecaller ::
July 06, 2016
Thanks so much, Paul!

TheresaTahara
TheresaTahara ::
July 06, 2016
Fabulous image and mood, Matthew. fae

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